For most of my tech life I’ve known Cooler Master for cases and components – at least a piece of every gaming rig I’ve constructed has come from them. This time I got to test drive some audio, with the newly released MH752 headset. With its debut this fall at PAX West, the MH752 is on the market this month, just in time to look at for yourself or the gamer in your life this holiday season.

Before we begin, here are some features:

  • Hi-fi 40mm drivers
  • In-line USB sound card with virtual controls and 7.1 virtual surround sound
  • Fold flat design
  • Ultra soft PU leather cushions
  • Detachable omni-directional microphone
  • Detachable and locking 3.5mm cable
  • PC, console, and mobile compatible

General Spec

Let me translate some of that for you. The MH752 can be plugged into a 3.5mm audio jack, but to take full advantage of what these headphones can do, you can plug it into the in-line sound card and use it through USB. This in-line sound card includes convenient audio controls that you can clip to your shirt or garment of your choosing while you game or stream, as well as a shiny button that says “7.1,” allowing simulated 7.1 surround sound quality for you. The mic is flexible and removable, allowing this to unit to move a bit into the world of 7.1 surround lifestyle headphones for plain media consumption. You all know me from reading this fine online publication I put out there for you, so you know I’m a fan of multiclassing – which made me excited to work with a headset that could pull double duty.

Audio Quality

OK, let’s get right to the point. A sub-$100 headset has no business being this good. At $99.99 retail, I expected that there would be a lot of cost-quality tradeoffs in sound or comfort or design.

But… no.

Operating through the USB in-line sound card, the MH752 delivered high-quality audio with clear and crisp tones across the spectrum. High and mid sounds came through clear as a bell and the bass hits, while not *quite* as pronounced, were still impressive. On its own that’s pretty good, but next was toggling the “7.1” button on the in-line control. This brought a new element to the gaming experience. Weather effects and the howling Himalayan winds were all around me in Rise of the Tomb Raider. Overwatch’s footsteps and weapons were clear as a bell.

Like I said a bit further up, removing the flexible microphone turned this into a set of straight-up headphones that I tested out by consuming as much media as possible from the web. Streaming various titles from YouTube, HBO Go and Netflix, the same thing that impressed me on the gaming side impressed me for media. With the 7.1 on, and the volume cranked, there was no loss of fidelity of any pops or chirps in the sound. At this price tag again, the expectation is that there will be some clipping at high volumes or fidelity issues, but Cooler Master really makes use of that 20-20,000Hz frequency response to deliver premium sound at all ranges.

Recording

I was able to scream like a small child when surprise zombie hordes hit me in Left 4 Dead 2 without killing anyone else’s ears with clicks or pops or distortion, so I’m not really sure what more needs to be said here.

Design and Comfort

Personally I love the minimalistic design of this headset. For those of you that read regularly, you’ll remember that I like devices that I can use both for gaming and everyday life – and that means designs that I feel like an adult using, without being forced into lights and sounds and “aggressive” features that look like they came from outer space. The MH752 gives me that sleek design I’m looking for, with sturdy and dark single color aesthetics adorned with a subtle Cooler Master “hexagon” on each of the ears. The fold-flat design and detachable microphone (not to mention the fancy accessory bag) make this easy to throw in my work bag and take with me too.

Along with the great sound, this is one of the most comfortable headsets I’ve ever donned, and that includes some of my lifestyle devices like my bluetooth Bose headphones. The headset is made with high density foam in the ear cups as well as the headband itself, which has a very broad range of fit – meaning that chances are very good that it will fit your dome, whatever its size. There was no pinch or pull on my ears, so I was able to get up from my desk after a couple hours of gaming without that sore feeling you can get from other devices.

Control

The one thing you have to watch out for is the volume control. The recording levels didn’t show up very well for me using the Windows 10 sound settings. Luckily though Cooler Master’s PORTAL software is a free download that allows you to change all of the levels to your liking with a built-in equalizer. You can also save specific mixer profiles in addition to the pre-loaded ones. It really lets you drill down to the type of sound you want from the headset.

Overall

Pros:

  • Value for Price
  • Comfortable for long gaming sessions
  • Portability
  • Additional sound card for simulated 7.1
  • No crazy “hey look at me I’m a gamer” design

Cons:

  • um… it doesn’t make you sandwiches?

Overall this is a high quality headset that won’t break your budget. At $99.99 you’re not going to find much better, as I would put this up against headsets that that are at higher price ranges. So if you’re looking for premium sound and comfort that will leave your wallet some leftover bucks to buy some games, the Cooler Master MH752 is a smart buy.

The Technical Fowl rating? 10/10.

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Author and creator of Technical Fowl. IT/Tech hero. Jiu Jitsu purple belt. Enjoying the venn diagram intersection of tech, gaming, business, and politics.

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About Tushar

Author and creator of Technical Fowl. IT/Tech hero. Jiu Jitsu purple belt. Enjoying the venn diagram intersection of tech, gaming, business, and politics.

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